When did “um” become a dirty word?

Denise Graveline has posted an interview with Michael Erard, author of Um…Slips, Stumbles, and Verbal Blunders, And What They Mean. Dyed in the wool Toastmasters will probably feel uncomfortable with Erard’s comments about Ralph Smedley’s dogmatism, but I think it’s kind of refreshing to hear someone speak out for naturalness and genuineness in speech. Follow the link to read the whole interview.

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5 responses to When did “um” become a dirty word?

  1. michael

    Mike, thanks for noticing the interview that Denise posted, and for praising naturalness in speech! I’m thinking of putting something together on linguistics for public speakers — do you think there’d be any interest in that?

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